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How to design a commercial kitchen in a small space

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The actual floor area of a kitchen is not the most important consideration when designing a commercial kitchen. The aim is to create an efficient and safe space for food preparation, and attention to ergonomics is most important to ensure that the kitchen will be both practical and profitable.

Your menu

First, make a list of the types of food that are likely to be prepared in the kitchen. Specify storage and preparation methods for each group so that you know what type of equipment you need for all the foods you may want to include on the menu in the future.

Equipment

List all the equipment you will need to incorporate in the kitchen. Include measurements where you can to ensure that your plans are going to work out in practice. Remember to allow for plenty of counter space for food preparation. All your equipment, from commercial refrigeration to ovens and fryers, will have to comply with industry safety standards. If you’re unsure of exactly what you need, you could attend the Commercial Kitchen Show at the NEC in Birmingham in June. Details can be found in The Caterer.

One of the best places to buy the equipment you need is online. It is simple to order what you need from kitchen suppliers or specialist companies such as https://www.fridgefreezerdirect.co.uk/commercial-refrigeration because it can be supplied quickly when you need it.

The site

You may already have a site, or you might be looking for somewhere suitable. As long as you have calculated the space you need to fit the equipment you need, the next step is to measure your chosen space accurately and sketch a plan. Remember to include doors and windows and where the existing services such as plumbing, drainage, air conditioning and electricity are situated.

Planning

Think about how the space will be used in your kitchen. You are aiming for maximum efficiency and functionality, but safety has to be the number one factor. You need to allow plenty of space for free movement when your employees are moving bulky items or carrying hot pots in the kitchen, but not so much that they have to walk excessive distances in the course of their duties. If the kitchen is badly planned, staff can suffer fatigue and are likely to be at greater risk of accidents.

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